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Take the Quito Metro to Sustainable Urban Development

Take the Quito Metro to Sustainable Urban Development

Habitat III is the United Nations Conference on Housing and Sustainable Urban Development which occurs once every 20 years since 1976. The third edition of this major and global UN event will take place in Quito, Ecuador, from 17 – 20 October 2016.  

The EIB is the EU bank. But it finances urban development outside the EU too, like the Quito Metro. Follow the map of the line under construction in Ecuador’s capital, where Habitat III takes place this month, to learn about projects the EIB took from the earliest stages through to implementation.

*hover over the metro stations to find out how EIB supports sustainable urban development

*scroll horizontally and select the metro stations to find out how EIB supports sustainable urban development 

Quito Metro

Advisory/technical assistance

The Mediterranean Hotspots Investment Programme identifies, screens and frames projects to reduce or prevent pollution and improve water resources. It already set in motion projects potentially worth EUR 1bn and aims for more – projects like the proposed wastewater system in Saida, a Lebanese city with a rising population due to the influx of Syrian refugees.

More about EIB projects in the southern Mediterranean and Middle East

Governance

EIB technical assistance supports a new urban district in Taparura, part of Tunisia’s second city, Sfax. The advice, in part, aims to transform the company carrying out the development into a public-private enterprise with clear governance, modern statutes, and a well-defined relationship with the government, the municipality and private developers - key to attracting private capital.

Discover how the EIB supports urban projects inside and outside the EU

Venture capital

Boost Africa is a new programme – part-funded by the EIB – to counter the brain drain of talented African entrepreneurs. The investment programme helps venture capitalists, who are key to innovation and job creation in African cities.

Learn more about the EIB in Africa

Grant blending

Lake Victoria is one of Africa’s most important natural resources. Water and sanitation facilities in three lakeside Tanzanian cities are being upgraded and extended with loans from the EIB and others. The project also gets grants from the EIB-administered EU-Africa Infrastructure Trust Fund, which blends grants with loans to foster sustainable growth.

How the EU-Africa Infrastructure Trust Fund improves lives in Africa

Collaboration

The EIB collaborates with the EU’s Neighbourhood Investment Facility to provide technical assistance and grants in the Mediterranean and Eastern Europe through the Municipal Project Support Facility, focusing on climate change mitigation.

Find out how EIB partnerships tackle climate change in the Middle East and North Africa

Migration

Jordan’s water shortage is severe. The arrival of refugees from across the Syrian border makes it worse. The Wadi al-Arab project will bring 30 million cubic metres of water annually to the northern city of Irbid. The USD 54m EIB investment is about half the total cost of the project.

Get details of new EIB initiatives and financing for migrants and refugees

Inclusive cities

Informal settlements have sprung up around Tunisian cities due to rapid population growth and urbanisation. The EIB has committed EUR 70m to improving the living conditions of more than 119 settlements. Technical assistance includes a focus on public participation in project selection.

Do you need technical assistance for your project? Read about the EIB’s services in the Mediterranean

Green cities

In Oujda, Morocco, an EIB-backed lagoon treatment system prepares urban wastewater for re-use in agriculture. The energy-efficient lagoon system stops the discharge of raw wastewater that used to find its way into drinking water in nearby Algeria.

Find out more about this major environmental and economic success story

Clean cities

Before the Panama City and Bay Sanitation Programme, untreated wastewater was released into rivers and the bay. The EIB provided two loans since the project’s inception in 2007.

Discover how the EIB supports a healthy water sector, which is critical to economic growth

Connected cities

Quito’s first Metro line will connect the city, north to south, in 34 minutes. In its first year, the Metro is expected to serve 124 million passengers, 85% of them captive public transport users. Backed by EUR 200m from the EIB, the project will foster economic development and create jobs.

Greener, faster, more sustainable. Read about the EIB-backed Quito Metro

Clean air cities

The EUR 450m EIB loan to finance the first Metro line in Lucknow, one of India’s six most polluted cities, will help increase the share of public transport in the city to 27% by 2030 from the current 10%, cutting CO2 emissions, too.

Get details of the EIB’s largest ever loan in India

Smart cities

Smart Cities is a collaboration between the EIB and Belgium’s Belfius Bank lending to towns for sustainable mobility, energy efficiency and smart districts. An EIB-backed research programme is assessing the application of Smart City projects in the Mediterranean region.

Take a look at the first EIB-backed smart cities projects taking shape in Belgium

Cultural cities

Many of the old towns  – or Medinas  – of North Africa and the Middle East risk becoming either slums or tourist museums. The EIB’s Medinas 2030 initiative supports the economic and social rehabilitation of historic towns, to create jobs and build vibrant places to live with improved housing and infrastructure.

Read a publication about MEDINAS 2030 Rehabilitation of Historic City Centres

Climate adaptation

In Saint Lucia, landslides and drought leave the economy at risk. The EIB plans two water projects on the Caribbean island to build climate resilience.

Transition to a low-carbon, environmentally friendly and climate-resilient economy with the EIB

Sustainable communities

The Zenata Urban Development Project brings together most EIB urban development priorities. Backed by the EIB, Zenata copes with Morocco’s harsh natural conditions by storing flood water to supply agriculture during dry periods. It channels wind to cool the city during the hottest months and includes public parks to moderate high temperatures. At COP22, Zenata became the first city to receive the international eco-label.

How the EIB finances economic development and improves living conditions in the Mediterranean

Head on over to the EIB blog to read more about the EIB’s sustainable urban development projects.

Or find out how EIB is contributing to the HABITAT III Conference and the New Urban Agenda on the events page.

Get the PDF version of the Quito Metro Map.



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